Long Wharf Theatre announces local Equity/Non-Equity auditions for the 50th anniversary season

Local Equity and Non-Equity actors, ages 18+, with access to local housing are invited to audition for the 50th Anniversary 2014/2015 Season at the Tony Award-winning Long Wharf Theatre in New Haven, CT.

Actors will be seen at the theatre on the following dates: EQUITY on Tuesday, May 27 and Wednesday May 28 from 10:00am to 1:30pm and 2:30pm to 6:00pm; and NON-EQUITY on Wednesday JUNE 11 and Thursday, June 12 from 10:00am to 1:30pm and 2:30pm to 6:00pm. Actors should prepare a brief modern or contemporary monologue not to exceed three minutes in length. All actors should bring a current resume and headshot. While walk-ins will be accommodated, appointments are strongly recommended and may be made beginning today by calling the Long Wharf Theatre box office (203-787-4282) between 10:00am and 5:00pm.

For more information: www.longwharf.org.

Answers to Frequently Asked Questions:

  1. Because Long Wharf holds auditions in NYC for each production, we are especially seeking actors with access to local housing at this call.
  1. Actors will be seen by Eric Ting, Associate Artistic Director.
  1. Long Wharf will be casting for all available roles for the 2014/2015 season at these auditions (see attached list).
  1. Directions:
    1. Train: Metro North to Union Station, New Haven, CT, and take a cab to the theatre.
    2. Car: Take Exit 46 off I-95 and follow the signs

Long Wharf Theatre is casting the following roles for our 2014-2015 Season:

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OUR TOWN

BY THORNTON WILDER.

DIRECTED BY GORDON EDELSTEIN

1st REH: SEPT 8, 2014

RUNS: OCTOBER 8 – NOVEMBER 9, 2014

** Actors of all ethnicity will be considered for these roles. **

SEEKING:

STAGE MANAGER

DR. GIBBS – a pleasant portly man in his 30s.

JOE CROWELL – eleven years old, a paperboy.

SI CROWELL – Joe’s younger brother, also a paperboy.

HOWIE NEWSOME – an overalled country “character” of about 30.

MRS. GIBBS – a plump peasant woman in her middle 30s.

MRS. WEBB – a thin, serious, crisp little woman in her 30s.

GEORGE GIBBS – male, sixteen years old.

REBECCA GIBBS – female, eleven years old.

WALLY WEBB – male, eleven years old.

EMILY WEBB – female, sixteen years old.

PROFESSOR WILLARD – a little dried-up man, nervous.

MR. WEBB – a smiling, quizzical man in his late 40s.

SIMON STIMSON – a long-faced “character” in his early thirties. Choir conductor. Often drunk.

MRS. SOAMES – female, early 30s, the town gossip.

CONSTABLE WARREN – the local policeman.

SAM CRAIG – male, 30s, more citified than others in the play.

JOE STODDARD – male, 60s.

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PICASSO AT THE LAPIN AGILE

BY STEVE MARTIN

DIRECTED BY GORDON EDELSTEIN

1st REH: OCT 28, 2014

RUNS: NOVEMBER 26 – DECEMBER 21, 2014

SEEKING:

FREDDY – the owner and bartender of the Lapin Agile.

GASTON – an older man.

GERMAINE – a waitress and Freddy’s girlfriend.

ALBERT EINSTEIN – male, age twenty-five.

SUZANNE/ THE COUNTESS/ FEMALE ADMIRER – female,nineteen.

SAGOT – Picasso’s art dealer.

PABLO PICASSO – male,age twenty-three.

CHARLES DABERNOV SCHMENDIMAN – a young man.

THE VISITOR – a polite and talented country boy time-traveler. He is a blue-suede-shoed musician. Also known as Elvis Presley.

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FOREVER      

BY DAEL ORLANDERSMITH

DIRECTED BY NEEL KELLER

1st REH: TBD

RUNS: JANUARY 2 – FEBRUARY 1, 2015

WOMAN – (This role is cast and will be played by Dael Orlandersmith)

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BAD JEWS

BY JOSHUA HARMON

DIRECTOR TBD

1st REH: JAN 20, 2015

RUNS: FEBRUARY 18 – MARCH 22, 2015

SEEKING:

DAPHNA FEYGENBAUM – Female, 22, Liam & Jonah’s first cousin. 2/3 body, 1/3 hair. Thick, intense, curly, frizzy, long brown hair. Hair that clogs a drain after one shower. Hair you find on pillows and in corners of the room and in your refrigerator six months after the head from which it grew last visited. Hair that could not be straightened even if you had four hours and three hairdressers double-fisting blow driers. Hair that screams: Jew.

LIAM HABER – Male, 25, Daphna’s cousin: his mother is the sister of Daphna’s father. Wire-rim glasses. U of Chicago Asian studies Ph.D. student. Former Fulbright scholar in Japan. Has as much of a sense of humor as an overdue library book.

JONAH HABER – Male, 21, Liam’s younger brother. Sometime-UVM sophomore. Less lanky than his brother. Less brainy. More brawn. More heart.

MELODY – Female, 24, Liam’s girlfriend. Short, stick-straight blonde hair. Which she wears with a barrette. To be extra cute. Mousy. She looks like someone who would have been abducted when she was nine but returned to her parents unharmed. Works for a non-profit.

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brownsville song (b-side for tray) ** 

BY KIMBER LEE

DIRECTED BY ERIC TING

** A co-production with Philadelphia Theatre Company

1st REH: FEB 24, 2015

RUNS: MARCH 25 – APRIL 19, 2015

SEEKING:

LENA – Black female, late 50s – early 60s.

TRAY – Black male, 18 years old.

MERRELL – Korean American female, 36 years old. Recovering alcoholic.

JUNIOR/ BROOKLYN COLLEGE STUDENT – Black male, 18-20 years old.

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THE SECOND MRS. WILSON                    

BY JOE DiPIETRO

DIRECTED BY GORDON EDELSTEIN

1st REH: APR 7, 2015

RUNS: MAY 6 – MAY 31, 2015

SEEKING:

EDITH WILSON – The first lady of the United States.

PRESIDENT WOODROW WILSON –  The 28th President of the United States.

COLONEL EDWARD HOUSE –  A Texan with a Texan’s charm. 50s. Slight and sickly.

DR. CARY GRAYSON –  The president’s personal physician. Late 30s.

SECRETARY JOE TUMULTY –  The president’s secretary. Irish–‐American. Acerbic, loyal, a Political animal. 40s.

SENATOR HARRY CABOT LODGE –  60s. Educated and literate. A powerhouse.

VICE PRESIDENT THOMAS MARSHALL –  65. Rather amiable.

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Long Wharf Theatre announces its 50th anniversary season

season

Long Wharf Theatre’s 50th anniversary is an opportunity to celebrate our rich history and to set our course for the future. We are delighted to announce our 2014-15 season – a mix of classics and new work that will surprise and delight our loyal audiences, while engaging them in some important issues of our day.

The season will begin in October with Thornton Wilder’s Our Town, directed by Artistic Director Gordon Edelstein on the Mainstage. Edelstein plans to present the production in a manner that mirrors the diversity of America today. “Our Town is one of the greatest plays written by an American in the 20th century. It is a profound meditation on life and death. The world of Our Town has changed since Wilder first wrote the play. Our production will endeavor to capture what our town is today, reflecting our city, our country, and our lives,” he said.

Following Long Wharf Theatre’s successful run of Steve Martin’s The Underpants in the 2013-14 Season, the famous funnyman’s writing returns with Picasso at the Lapin Agile on the Mainstage in November. “The play is a comic celebration of genius and ingenuity at the dawn of the 20th century. With brilliant comic arias and surprises at every turn, it is Steve Martin’s homage to the genius and amazing thought that will be born in the 20th century,” he said.

Dael Orlandersmith, who enthralled Long Wharf Theatre audiences in productions of Yellowman and The Blue Album, returns to Stage II in January with her newest work, Forever, an intimate look at family and identity, directed by Neel Keller. “Dael Orlandersmith has been an important part of Long Wharf Theatre’s theatrical legacy for two decades. She is one of the most unflinching, honest and powerful voices in the American theatre. She returns to us with her most powerful piece yet,” Edelstein said.

Bad Jews, by Joshua Harmon, will take Stage II in February. Cousins get together in the wake of their grandfather’s death to work out exactly what his legacy means in their own lives. The New York Times described the play as “the best comedy of the season.”

brownsville song (b-side for tray), a new play by Kimber Lee and directed by Associate Artistic Director Eric Ting in March, personifies the plague of urban violence through the experiences of a teenager and his family. Lee was interested in exploring the way time moves during periods of grief, she said. The play will be co-produced with Philadelphia Theater Company. “This is a beautiful play. I wish we could say that the subject is no longer current, that it is outdated, but sadly that is not the case. A vibrant, great kid who is getting his life together gets killed. This play is about the repercussions of that. We hope this play will create conversations in our community,” Edelstein said.

Long Wharf Theatre will dramatize a fascinating event in our nation’s history in the world premiere of The Second Mrs. Wilson by Joe DiPietro, directed by Edelstein, closing the season. “This is an astonishing story of a woman’s victory in a world run by men. For many months, First Lady Edith Wilson ran the country. Woodrow Wilson was incapacitated by stroke, the legacy of World War I was looming in Europe, and the League of Nations was in jeopardy. Through her wit, intelligence, and political savvy, she surprised everyone around her,” Edelstein said.

Subscriptions are already on sale. Single tickets will go on sale Monday, August 4.

Long Wharf Theatre’s 50th Anniversary Season

OUR TOWN  

BY THORNTON WILDER

DIRECTED BY GORDON EDELSTEIN

CLAIRE TOW STAGE IN THE C. NEWTON SCHENCK III THEATRE

OCTOBER 8-NOVEMBER 2, 2014

PRESS OPENING:  WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2014

EMILY: Do human beings ever realize life while they live it  — every, every minute?

STAGE MANAGER: No. The saints and poets ­maybe. They do some.

An unquestioned classic of the American theatre told with sly humor and profound meaning, we are transported to Grover’s Corners, a place of secret wishes and disappointments, loves and losses, where the people we meet are shockingly like the ones in our own lives. Meet Emily and George. They’ve grown up together in their small New England town, falling in love in a surprisingly complicated way. Their growing up, their living, and their dying provide the lens through which the story is told, a story that focuses on a village but encompasses the eternal, finding the world in a grain of sand. “Indeed the play’s success across cultural borders around the world attests to its being something much greater than an American play: it is a play that captures the universal experience of being alive.” ­ Donald Margulies

***

PICASSO AT THE LAPIN AGILE

BY STEVE MARTIN

DIRECTED BY GORDON EDELSTEIN

CLAIRE TOW STAGE IN THE C. NEWTON SCHENCK III THEATRE

NOVEMBER 26-DECEMBER 21, 2014

PRESS OPENING: WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2014

PICASSO: I could dream it forever and still not do it, but when the time comes for it to be done, God, I want to be ready for it.

What happens when Picasso and Einstein walk into a bar? Intellectual fireworks, verbal gymnastics, amorous intentions, and the arrival of a mysterious man in blue suede shoes. On an October evening in 1904, Albert Einstein and Pablo Picasso end up at the same small bar in Paris ­- the Lapin Agile. The two young geniuses, joined by an eccentric cast of characters, spar over art and science, their respective libidos, where inspiration comes from, and the promise and dreams of the 20th century.  Steve Martin brings his zany and profoundly intelligent brand of humor back to Long Wharf Theatre. ­––­ No joke is too low brow and no idea too high brow to be considered in this crowd pleasing comedy.

***

FOREVER       

BY DAEL ORLANDERSMITH

DIRECTED BY NEEL KELLER

WORLD PREMIERE

STAGE II

JANUARY 2-FEBRUARY 1, 2015

PRESS OPENING: WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 7, 2015

DAEL: You knew at a very young age how cruel the world can be And You found the beauty/strength to defend yourself against that cruelty And Then you turned the world on its ear

HARLEM, Père Lachaise Cemetery, rock ’n’ roll, Jim Morrison, Richard Wright, poetry and ghosts. Celebrated playwright/performer Dael Orlandersmith returns to Long Wharf Theatre for a limited world premiere run of her newest play, Forever. Forever is a riveting and masterful piece about family — the ones we were born into, the ones we create for ourselves — and the legacies that shape us all. “Dael Orlandersmith is a highly acclaimed playwright, but it’s her breathtaking command of the stage as the star of her own works, many of which are solo shows, that often most impresses.” ­- TheaterMania

***

BAD JEWS

BY JOSHUA HARMON

STAGE II

FEBRUARY 18-MARCH 22, 2015

PRESS OPENING: WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2015

DAPHNA: Chai? It’s the Hebrew word for life … It’s made of gold, it’s not very big, and Poppy wore it on a  chain around his neck his whole life.

When Daphna arrived at the funeral of her beloved grandfather, she thought it was obvious that she would get her Poppy’s chai, a religious necklace he carried throughout the Holocaust. After all, she’s the one on the way to rabbinical school with plans to move to Israel. Her cousin Liam arrived with his girlfriend Melody with a very different plan in mind. A biting comedy about the perhaps not always discernible difference between being devout and devouring, Bad Jews deals with issues of legacy and tradition with humor and wit.

***

brownsville song (b-side for tray)      

BY KIMBER LEE

DIRECTED BY ERIC TING

CLAIRE TOW STAGE IN THE C. NEWTON SCHENCK III THEATRE

A co-production with Philadelphia Theatre Company

MARCH 25-APRIL 19, 2015

PRESS OPENING: WEDNESDAY, APRIL 1, 2015

TRAY: I am writing my own story and this is not the end. This is the beginning.

This shatteringly poetic and beautiful story jumps between a hopeful future and an uncertain present to show a unique perspective on the scourge of urban violence. Eighteen-year-old Tray is committed to making something of himself.  He’s working on his college essays, boxing at the gym, and holding down a part time job. When he happens to be at the wrong place at the wrong time, a senseless act ends his life, leaving his family to ponder what might have been. “Lee offers a drama with writing so intimate that it bestows her story with the power to unlock hearts and have audiences more fully and seriously consider the lives at stake today amid the violence in America.”­ – Louisville Courier-Journal

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THE SECOND MRS. WILSON                     

BY JOE DiPIETRO

DIRECTED BY GORDON EDELSTEIN

CLAIRE TOW STAGE IN THE C. NEWTON SCHENCK III THEATRE

WORLD PREMIERE

MAY 6-31, 2015

PRESS OPENING: MAY 13, 2015

EDITH: Mark my word, someday my husband will rise from that bed, and stand before us and either thank us for saving his presidency, or curse us for throwing it all away. That is the choice God has put before us.  And that is the choice I put before you now.

In the aftermath of World War I, First Lady Edith Wilson believes her new husband, President Woodrow Wilson, was put on earth by God to prevent future cataclysms and build a League of Nations, assuring peace across the globe. When her husband’s health is threatened, Edith takes unprecedented steps, including keeping the Vice President and the Congress at bay, to assure that their dream will come to pass.  Asserting her own will in the old boys’ club of Washington, D.C., the First Lady protects her husband while claiming a slice of power for herself.  The Second Mrs. Wilson chronicles a unique incident in United States history with intrigue and excitement.

***

– Steven Scarpa

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Sisters honor their parents legacy at Long Wharf Theatre

Sarah and Ruth Greenblatt decided to honor their parents by purchasing a seat in their honor in the Mainstage

Sarah and Ruth Greenblatt decided to honor their parents by purchasing a seat in their honor in the Mainstage

Going to the theatre means different things to different people. For many people it is sheer entertainment and spectacle. For others it is a place to try on different personas and ideas – to understand another’s perspective on the world. For others it is a special night. For most people, it is probably a mix of all three.

For Sarah and Ruth Greenblatt, coming to Long Wharf Theatre is about family.

On a quiet weekday afternoon, the sisters sat on either side of Section D, Row G, Seat 7 and placed a small plaque on the arm of the seat between them and looked around the theatre. The plaque said “In loving memory of Evy and Mort Greenblatt.” “I am so glad we did this,” Ruth said. “This would mean so much to them.”

Evelyn and Morton Greenblatt, their parents, had been coming to Long Wharf Theatre since its inception in 1965. Now that they both had passed away, their daughters were looking for a suitable way to honor them. In many ways, Long Wharf Theatre’s Mainstage was a kind of home away from home, a place where many memories were made, so the sisters decided to dedicate a seat in their honor. Thanks to a combination of their own contributions, donations made by friends in honor of Evelyn, and a matching gift through Sarah’s employer, they were able to give their parents permanent acknowledgement in the Mainstage. “It’s been in the family,” Sarah said. “This was their thing.”

Morton passed away in 2006 but Evelyn kept coming to the theatre, often bringing Ruth along with her. They would have dinner at Brazi’s before hand, and then head on over to the matinee. Satchmo at the Waldorf was the final show she saw before she died in September 2013.

Evy was a former journalist and social worker who had passionate feelings about what she saw on stage, her daughters said. She freely critiqued the work of directors and loved the regional theatre model – the diversity of plays, the caliber of actors she’d see, the quality of the productions themselves. “They just loved it,” Ruth said.

Sarah and Ruth decided to spend another year subscribing to the theatre, just the way her mom and dad did for over four decades. “We should be able to get these seats,” Sarah said, wanting to continue to share the experience with her parents.

– Steven Scarpa

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How they got started: Adam Halpin and Katie Rose Clarke of The Last Five Years

One of the best conversations to have with a theatre person is their origin story – the play that got them hooked in the first place. For the stars of The Last Five Years, Katie Rose Clarke and Adam Halpin, the stories are both familiar and unique unto themselves.

Adam Halpin

Adam Halpin

Adam Halpin grew up as a serious athlete, a baseball player through his senior year of high school. But his life was surrounded by musical theatre. His mother played the Broadway recordings in the car when they drove around. His uncle had all of the great Broadway vinyl records, going all the way back to the 1930s. He grew up in New Jersey, so trips into the city to see the latest hit were a regular occurrence. “It was always engrossed in my family,” he said. “It was there. It was in the blood. Despite my great effort with sports, musical theatre was always there for me.”

Halpin began college studying finance, realized he was miserable and fell sway to the siren song of acting and singing, something he started in high school. “I think the show that did it for me, although there were many along the way, the show that ultimately turned me, was Rent, which I was able to do. It was crazy and such a dream to have loved something so much, and to be a part of it. I think that was a nail in the coffin for me. There was no going back,” he said.

Katie Rose Clarke

Katie Rose Clarke

Katie Rose Clarke was always around music, but not necessarily the theatre, while growing up in a small town in Texas. She recalled being in junior high and becoming smitten with it while watching her brother and sister in their high school play. She followed them to every rehearsal and performance of their production of My Fair Lady. “I am still friends with the girl who played Eliza Doolittle in that production. She’s an actor in the city,” Clarke said.

Clarke, now a stage struck teen found her own voice through a supportive music teacher. The teacher introduced Clarke to the musical theatre canon, coaching her along. Once she realized that she had a talent for the theatre, carefully cultivated by her teacher, Clarke knew what her life’s path would be. “She really believed in me. It was through her that I got my first connection, my first big break,” Clarke said.

Every theatre person remembers the first one, the thing they saw that made them realize that participating in this dream world was where they belonged.

– Steven Scarpa

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Next Stage Productions begins work on TYA production

The Cast at Inroductions

On Wednesday, April 9 2014, rehearsals began for Wiley and the Hairy Man presented by the Next Stage Program at Long Wharf Theatre. The evening began with introductions and designer presentations. Everyone gathered around has Scenic Designer, Kevin Grab, and Costume Designer, Carl Ramsey, gave their presentations.

Kevin Grab presenting the set design

Kevin Grab presenting the set design

Afterward, the cast was left to get comfortable and open their scripts for the first read-through. The first read-through is an exciting undertaking where voices and initial interpretations come to life for the first time. We asked Ryan Ronan, Wiley, what his expectations were for this production. “It’s going to be great!” he exclaimed, “I’m inspired by this story and connect with its message of facing your fears.” Although this is his first time doing the Theatre for Young Audiences production at Long Wharf Theatre, he has done Shake-It-Up Shakespeare three times and was a part of the West Haven High School Theatre Workshop. “I’m really excited to be back”, said Ryan; and all of us are excited to have him and the rest of the cast and crew in this fantastical journey of Wiley and the Hairy Man.

Carl Ramsay going over his costume design concepts

But in another part of the theatre, another journey is well on its feet. James Hicks, Scenic Resident at Long Wharf Theatre and Technical Director for the play, is hard at work building the set.

James working on the set 2

But it’s not only James, other departments are hard at work designing and constructing the various aspects that go into this production. Sets, props, lights, sound and costumes all come together through collaboration and diligence into an experience like no other!

Come see Wiley and the Hairy Man playing May 16th at 7pm, May 17th at 11am and 2pm, and May 18th at 2pm and see where this journey takes us! Tickets, in advance, are $5 for adults and $1 for children and seniors; and $10 for adults and $5 for children and seniors at the door.

– John Marsalis, Company Management Resident

 

 

 

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Alec asks Jaime to prom at LWT

The big ask!

The big ask!

The Last Five Years is its own small gem of a musical, 88 minutes of the highs and lows of a relationship between two artistic New Yorkers trying to build their lives and careers together. This work, with its clever lyrics, romantic love story, and wide array of musical styles has inspired fierce personal loyalty among its many fans.

The New York Times wrote a piece last year about this phenomenon, asking their readers what drew them to the show. They told stories of blossoming love and deep regrets. Some attached fond memories of the musical to particular times in their lives. “Young people and older people can really relate to these characters. Characters that don’t end up together, people are taken with that. There is almost something more interesting about seeing the possibility of it,” said Adam Halpin, playing Jamie in Long Wharf Theatre’s production of the musical.

Still others loved the inventive structure, appreciating the musical for daring to do something very different with their hallowed form. In the end, though, it’s the doomed romance of Cathy and Jamie’s story that connects with people in a deep and meaningful way. It causes them to connect with each other and with their own inner lives in interesting ways.

Local high school students Alec Palmer and Jaime Terrazzino used Long Wharf Theatre as the backdrop for their own bit of romance. A few nights ago Palmer brought Terrazzino to the theatre, and asked her to go to prom with him, handing her a special show poster he made to commemorate the event, and a bundle of roses. They then shared their special evening on Twitter. “Got asked to prom at the @Long_Wharf by @ayyy_PALM almost expected @katieroseclarke to walk out and be in on it,” she wrote, referencing one of the stars of our upcoming production of The Last Five Years.

Staff saw the exchange, was charmed by the teens’ excitement, and decided to offer the high school kids a couple of tickets to see the show to complete the package.  “I actually almost starting crying when the Long Wharf offered to set up a date for @ayyy_PALM and I to see #TheLastFiveYears,” she wrote.

Perhaps this is the beginning of their own romantic story, albeit one with a happy ending.

– Steve Scarpa

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First Rehearsal: The Last Five Years

The company of The Last Five Years - director Gordon Edelstein, Katie Rose Clarke, Adam Halpin, musical director James Sampliner

The company of The Last Five Years – director Gordon Edelstein, Katie Rose Clarke, Adam Halpin, musical director James Sampliner

First rehearsal is its own kind of ritual at Long Wharf Theatre. The cast and company get together and introduce themselves. The artists talk a little bit about their vision for the play, and then the cast reads the script together for the first time.

Our production of The Last Five Years provided a welcome departure from that script. The actors Katie Rose Clarke and Adam Halpin got together for a few days before the company assembled, working with Musical Director James Sampliner to get a handle on the music. So, after a few brief remarks from director Gordon Edelstein, Clarke and Halpin favored the company with a duet.

The romantic ballad, entitled “The Next Ten Minutes” comes at the middle of the play, and chronicles Jamie and Cathy’s hope for a future full of love and happiness. Clarke and Halpin were in mid-run form, vocals soaring, connecting with each other through the music.

“There’s so many lives I want to share with you. I’ll never be complete until I do,” Jamie, played by Halpin, sung.

“I will never be complete. I will never be sure. I’ll never change the world until I do,” Clarke’s Cathy responds later in the song.

It was a bravura performance, and only whetted the appetite of the staff for what the rest of the rehearsal process might hold. Edelstein was smitten by their performance, and excited by the prospect of working on this beautiful score. “I’ve loved this musical since I first heard it,” he said.

– Steve Scarpa

 

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Split Knuckle Theatre Company’s Endurance to play Stage II in June

The Split Knuckle Theatre Company will kick off Long Wharf Theatre's 2014 summer season with its production of Endurance

The Split Knuckle Theatre Company will kick off Long Wharf Theatre’s 2014 summer season with its production of Endurance

Long Wharf Theatre will present Split Knuckle Theatre’s production of Endurance to begin its 2014 Summer Season.

The performances will take place June 17-29, 2014 on Long Wharf Theatre’s Stage II. Tickets are $55 with student discounts available.

The piece was devised and performed by Jason Bohon, Andrew Grusetskie, Michael Toomey, and Greg Webster. The creative team includes Nick Ryan (collaborating writer), Ken Clark (musical composition), Dan Rousseau (lighting), and Carmen Torres (stage manager.)

The year is 1914.  Trapped in Antarctica with no hope of rescue, the great British explorer Sir Ernest Shackleton kept 27 men alive for two years in the most inhospitable climate on Earth. Ninety-five years later, in the worst economic meltdown since the Great Depression, Hartford insurance man Walter Spivey, struggling to justify his recent promotion and save his employees’ jobs, relives Shackleton’s story. Can one of the greatest leaders in human history inspire Walter to save his men ? The internationally acclaimed Split Knuckle Theatre Company presents this funny, physical and moving exploration of how the human spirit can conquer any obstacle with wit, humor, and invention.

Endurance continues to travel the world and tour to great acclaim. When performed at Shakespeare and Company in the Berkshires in 2012,  Berkshire on Stage said “people should not hesitate to go and be entertained. And enlightened. And amazed.” Curtain Up said “The members of the phenomenal quartet … have created this poignantly and hilarious, sometimes bordering on zany, examination of what it means to overcome life’s obstacles no matter the time period.

Split Knuckle Theatre formed in 2005 in London England, beginning with an adaptation of John Steinbeck’s The Pearl, which received a 5-Star review from The Scotsman at  Edinburgh Festival. Since that time they have traveled and performed in 19 different counties and across the United States.

Greg Webster, a New Haven resident and University of Connecticut professor in Movement Theatre, said the ensemble are all trained in method of collaboration and creation  of the French theatrical artist Jacques Lecoq, whose physical techniques inspired works like Sleep No More and War HorseEndurance was inspired by two things, Webster said: a dream in which he saw a business man being swallowed by a photocopier, and his long admiration of the unique heroics of explorer Ernest Shackleton. These two ideas taken in tandem prompted a series of improvisations  and exploration that resulted in the play.

Working at a residency at UConn in 2008, Webster encouraged actors, musicians and writers to all be together in the rehearsal room at the same time, exploring different ideas using their respective disciplines. They would then improvise based on a theme, and writers would then create scenes based on their improvisations. The end results went through a rigorous editing process “Theatre has to do something different from television and film,” Webster said. “It has to engage the imagination.”

Webster said that Split Knuckle is planning to make its permanent home here in New Haven and the company is currently at work creating two new devised pieces, which will be released  in the spring of 2015.

For more information about Split Knuckle Theatre, visit www.splitknuckletheatre.org.

– Steve Scarpa

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John Lithgow returns to Long Wharf Theatre to perform his one-man show

John Lithgow returns to Long Wharf Theatre

John Lithgow returns to Long Wharf Theatre

Gala 2014 Presenting Sponsor
FirstNiagaraFoundationLogo

John Lithgow came to Long Wharf Theatre in 1973 to perform in David Storey’s “The Changing Room,” and perhaps direct some projects for then-Artistic Director Arvin Brown. He was, at that point in his young career, a journeyman actor finding steady and perhaps meaningful work in regional theatres.

“It felt like home. I was perfectly prepared to work there for the rest of my life,” Lithgow wrote about Long Wharf Theatre in his recent memoir “Drama: An Actor’s Education.”

A young John Lithgow in his Tony Award performance in The Changing Room

A young John Lithgow in his Tony Award performance in The Changing Room

“The Changing Room” changed his life. Three weeks after his Broadway debut, Lithgow won a Tony Award, launching a beloved and prolific career on stage and screen.

Lithgow will return home, so to speak, in June, performing his one man show, Stories by Heart at Long Wharf Theatre’s 2014 Gala. Invoking memories of his grandmother and father before him, Mr. Lithgow traces his roots as an actor and storyteller, interspersing his own story with a great story read to him and his siblings when they were children – “Uncle Fred Flits By” by P.G. Wodehouse. In the Wodehouse tale, a fretful young Englishman is taken on a wild afternoon’s escapade in suburban London by his irrepressible uncle. In a hilarious tour de force, Lithgow performs with zany abandon, portraying ten distinct, outrageous characters (including a parrot).

Gala tickets start at $300. Limited number of performance only tickets may be available in May. Invitations to the Gala are available by calling 203.772.8234 or emailing kathy.cihi@longwharf.org.

 

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Gladwell and Gopnik to speak at Long Wharf Theatre April 17

 

Malcolm Gladwell and Adam Gopnik

Malcolm Gladwell and Adam Gopnik

Long Wharf Theatre is holding a “Creative Conversation,” featuring New Yorker writers Malcolm Gladwell and Adam Gopnik on Thursday, April 17 at 7 pm on the Claire Tow Stage in the C. Newton Schenck III Theatre.

Tickets are $50. To buy tickets, visit www.longwharf.org or call 203-787-4282.

“We are extremely excited to announce this unmissable event,” said Artistic Director Gordon Edelstein. “This wide ranging conversation on innovation and creativity is sure to be inspirational.”

The event is sponsored by Assa Abloy, Connecticut Innovations, Stratton Faxon, WSHU, and the University of New Haven: The Graduate School of Business and the Alvine Enrichment Program.

Malcolm Gladwell is the author of five New York Times bestsellers — “The Tipping Point”, “Blink”, “Outliers”, “What the Dog Saw”, and now, his latest, “David and Goliath: Underdogs, Misfits and the Art of Battling Giants.” He has been named one of the 100 most influential people by TIME magazine and one of the Foreign Policy’s Top Global Thinkers. He has been a staff writer for The New Yorker since 1996. He has won a national magazine award and been honored by the American Psychological Society and the American Sociological Society. Malcolm is an extraordinary speaker: always on target, aware of the context and the concerns of the audience, informative and practical, poised, eloquent and warm and funny. He has an unsurpassed ability to be both entertaining and challenging.

Adam Gopnik has been writing for The New Yorker since 1986. During his tenure at the magazine, he has written fiction and humor pieces, book reviews, profiles, reporting pieces, and more than a hundred stories for “The Talk of the Town” and “Comment.” His books, ranging from essay collections about Paris and food to children’s novels, include “Paris to the Moon” (2000), “The King in the Window” (2005), “Through the Children’s Gate: A Home in New York” (2006), “Angels and Ages: A Short Book About Darwin, Lincoln, and Modern Life” (2009), “The Table Comes First: Family, France, and the Meaning of Food” (2011), and “Winter: Five Windows on the Season” (2011). Gopnik has won the National Magazine Award for Essays and for Criticism three times, and also the George Polk Award for Magazine Reporting. He is an active lecturer, and delivered the Canadian Broadcasting Corporations Massey Lectures in 2011. Gopnik lives in New York.

There are a very limited number of patron tickets available at $1,000, which includes premier seating and an invitation to a reception with the speakers.  For more information about this opportunity, contact Director of Development Eileen Wiseman, 203.772.8237 or eileen.wiseman@longwharf.org

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